NYC Photo Safari Blog


Take better pictures of New York City!

17 Mar 14
Category: Photo Tips and tagged with camera tips, photo tips, photography tricks, photo class
Grainy photos are better than blurry ones is another common adage that makes its way around photography discussions.

This is not true in all cases. What if you want blur to show motion? What if you want to show something abstractly through the use of blurred fields of color? In these instances grain is not better than blur.

12 Mar 14
Category: Photo Tips and tagged with photo tips, photo class
It is curious to think about how the use of the words "horizontal" and "vertical" in photography and other print media is

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04 Mar 14
Category: Photo Tips and tagged with photo safari, photo tips, photography tricks, photo class
You might have heard to always underexpose by 2/3rds of a stop when shooting in broad daylight. Again, we here at NYC Photo Safari believe

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04 Mar 14
Category: Photo Tips and tagged with photo safari, camera tips, photo tips, photo class


YES IT IS! Digital photography has a much longer latitude than film, more than double. The resolution from an average digital camera today has better resolution than 35mm film. Digital cameras allow you to change the ISO on the fly, rather than having to wait until you finish the role of film. You can control your ISO in one third stop increments. You can control your f/stops and shutter speeds in 1/3 increments as well. Digital has allowed the photographer to post process images exactly the way the photographer wants, without having to rely on someone down at the lab to do it and possibly get it wrong.

Digital photography has allowed us to experiment more without having to consider the cost of film and developing. Digital cameras have allowed more people to enjoy photography.

For the last time: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY IS BETTER THAN FILM!

04 Mar 14
Category: Photo Tips and tagged with photo safari, camera tips, photo tips, photography tricks, photo class


No it doesn't. Using compositional rules as rules rather than guidelines will help you achieve boring pictures more often than not. Although all of our instructors will teach the rule of thirds on a Photo Safari, it does not mean that mindlessly putting something in the thirds corner will render an acceptable composition. You still have to consider a few things such as the visual balance of the image. Are your eyes pulled too heavily to one side or another of the image? Does the composition communicate the intended idea?

Another problem with this rule is that it would mean that the center does not work, or perhaps the author is saying that it will work 1% of the time. Nonetheless 1% is a pretty low number. The fact is that the center can work and for some it can be made to work 100% of the time.

Although the rule of thirds is a solid start, the photographer still needs to consider the entire frame and should have more than one tool in their toolbox.